hundredthousandhearts:

thisgingerisrad:

stop telling fat people that they shouldn’t call themselves fat

stop telling us that “fat” is a bad word

stop telling us that our state of being is a fucking insult

and can you please stop telling me i’m not fat?

#’i wouldnt call her FAT id say CURVY’ #by ‘curvy’ you mean ‘fat’ and ‘decently attractive’ #you just don’t understand that those two things are allowed to go together (x)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Found! First Earth-Size Planet That Could Support Life
For the first time, scientists have discovered an Earth-size alien planet in the habitable zone of its host star, an “Earth cousin” that just might have liquid water and the right conditions for life.
The newfound planet, called Kepler-186f, was first spotted by NASA’s Kepler space telescope and circles a dim red dwarf star about 490 light-years from Earth. While the host star is dimmer than Earth’s sun and the planet is slightly bigger than Earth, the positioning of the alien world coupled with its size suggests that Kepler-186f could have water on its surface, scientists say. You can learn more about the amazing alien planet find in a videoproduced by Space.com.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Found! First Earth-Size Planet That Could Support Life

For the first time, scientists have discovered an Earth-size alien planet in the habitable zone of its host star, an “Earth cousin” that just might have liquid water and the right conditions for life.

The newfound planet, called Kepler-186f, was first spotted by NASA’s Kepler space telescope and circles a dim red dwarf star about 490 light-years from Earth. While the host star is dimmer than Earth’s sun and the planet is slightly bigger than Earth, the positioning of the alien world coupled with its size suggests that Kepler-186f could have water on its surface, scientists say. You can learn more about the amazing alien planet find in a videoproduced by Space.com.

Continue Reading

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Remember, if the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember what happened to a boy who was good, and kind, and brave, because he strayed across the path of Lord Voldemort. Remember Cedric Diggory.

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#hp
Anonymous asked: hey, it's kind of mean that you would say that you're disappointed in people who find profundity in john green's writing... i think people are allowed to find meaning in whatever they connect with, and the fact that you find him corny doesn't mean you should take that enjoyment away from others. like i find harry potter corny as hell, but i understand the appeal of it, especially if it was read in younger years. anyway, you don't have to reply to this i just wanted you to maybe think about it :)

me not liking something doesn’t make other people unable to enjoy it though. i don’t see how me thinking he’s overrated and annoying and corny as hell is taking away the enjoyment of him from his fans. they can still enjoy him, my opinion of him shouldn’t mean that much to them. also i think you misunderstood what i was saying…i said i’m disappointed to find out certain people like him, i didn’t say “i’m disappointed in people for liking him” like the way your mom says she’s disappointed in you for getting detention or something. there’s a difference. also your mom’s opinion of you matters and my opinion of you doesn’t matter, at all, because who am i? i’m nobody, there’s no reason to care what i think.

plus i mean, people can do whatever they want and enjoy whatever they enjoy. i enjoy some corny shit, but at least i acknowledge that it’s corny. i LOVE harry potter and it means a lot to me but i’m also not out here trying to claim it’s profound and and meaningful. i love one direction but i’m not acting like they’re some obscure indie band and saying “oh these guys are real music not like that garbage you listen to” and that’s exactly what john green fans say, they act like his books are somehow more meaningful than any other mediocre YA novel. john green acts like he’s some deep philosopher who sees truths about the world that nobody else sees, but to me his observations are trite. i think if you’re claiming your writing is super insightful, i’m allowed to be more critical of your writing than i would be of a children’s fantasy series. and i think i’m allowed to be disappointed in the sense of “aw man, really? that guy? really?!” when i discover that people i like and respect are fans of this dude who is, in my personal opinion, a cheesy pretentious pseudointellectual.

i’m not trying to hurt anyone’s feelings, i swear. but also this is my blog where i express my opinions about stuff. if i say i don’t like a writer, and that it bums me out to see some of my friends liking him, that doesn’t make me a mean person. i’m still a nice person, i just don’t like the thing you like and i think i’m allowed to talk about that.

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omniastudios:

"Arianna" art deco inspired mermaid ring.

Available in brass and sterling silver. Arianna holds an 8mm black or white pearl.

Now available for purchase.

www.omniaoddities.com

huffleluff:

gay and lesbian monosexuals who complain about heterosexuality being the default and then turn around and interrogate bisexuals about their experiences with same-gender intimacy, or claim that bisexuals currently in a male/female relationship are straight. wtf. you are a part of the problem. by demanding we show ‘proof’ of our gayness, you are upholding heterosexuality as the default sexual orientation. you are literally saying, if you are not doing something explicitly gay at this very moment, you are straight. i don’t even.

abby-graceful:

"bisexuals have straight passing privilege"
did you mean bi erasure ?
having people constantly assume im straight or gay based on who im dating or how I dress isn’t a privilege. it’s degrading and ignorant.


Harry cruises through Beverly Hills on his motorcycle - 04/17

Harry cruises through Beverly Hills on his motorcycle - 04/17

Rather than fighting for every woman’s right to feel beautiful, I would like to see the return of a kind of feminism that tells women and girls everywhere that maybe it’s all right not to be pretty and perfectly well behaved. That maybe women who are plain, or large, or old, or differently abled, or who simply don’t give a damn what they look like because they’re too busy saving the world or rearranging their sock drawer, have as much right to take up space as anyone else.

I think if we want to take care of the next generation of girls we should reassure them that power, strength and character are more important than beauty and always will be, and that even if they aren’t thin and pretty, they are still worthy of respect. That feeling is the birthright of men everywhere. It’s about time we claimed it for ourselves."

popculturebrain:

New Trailer: ‘Orange Is the New Black' Season 2 - June 6

The skin is an unreliable barrier, and I think we would prefer that it wasn’t.

Inside and outside, natural and artificial: As soon as you examine these concepts closely they start to unravel. What about the fact that much of the food we now eat can hardly be described as natural? What about vitamin pills? Does a facial count as inside or outside? What about diets promising glowing skin as their main benefit, or pills promising healthier hair? Is long-term skin maintenance with SPF and moisturiser natural or artificial? How about piercings and tattoos? Sheesh.

Donna Haraway’s famous “Cyborg Manifesto” (1985) uses the cyborg as an “ironic political myth” to describe the way traditional human boundaries are coming unstuck. Human-animal, human-machine, inside-outside, natural-artificial: It is even more true now than it was in 1985 that we live within very blurred lines. Photoshopped selfies of ourselves in Spanx and full makeup are fast becoming the foundation of our identities, in our virtual-real lives. It’s funny how “natural” used be the ideal image of beauty—though frequently with artificial help, beauty was at least supposed to look spontaneous. Now “natural” can be used as a word of dread, deployed by glossy magazines to describe the nightmare in which someone sees you sans foundation; or it’s a word used to sell BB creams and other faux-natural effects. Artificial is all the rage, in our eyelashes, hair color and extensions, nails and tans.

Does this matter? It certainly did to Jonathan Swift, and it did to Naomi Wolf, who argued in The Beauty Myth how useful the artificial beauty ideal is to patriarchal capitalism. It does cost women a lot of time and money. Haraway’s open-minded discussion of the cyborg is a good counterpoint to the knee-jerk fear surrounding any threat to traditional ideas of what it is to be human, and if a decent SPF face cream and some vitamin pills make me a cyborg then I’m fine with that (yes, there are better reasons to embrace cyborg life, such as prosthetic limbs, but hey).

And if an acceptance of our “posthuman” cyborg existence (Haraway again) helps us become less squeamish about the unpredictable boundary of our skin, then that is also good. It might mean that we can question the role of surgery, dietary supplements, and makeup in our world in a more clear-minded way, and perhaps make our relationship with beauty less fraught. At the moment I think that we do judge beauty work partly by where it sits on the spectrum between adornment and alteration, and that it is definitely a problem when societal pressure makes people want to change themselves from the inside out. It would take at least another essay to discuss that other unreliable binary, free and unfree choice, to determine the motives for the beauty work that we do (am I really plucking my eyebrows for me? Really?), and all beauty work comes under the shadow of oppression along with its undeniable joys.

But I still think earrings are OK.

"
— Carina Hart, [x]
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Writer and director Elena Rossini has released the first four minutes of The Illusionists. The documentary is a critique of a high standard of beauty but, unlike some that focus exclusively on the impacts of Western women, Rossini’s film looks as though it will do a great job of illustrating how Western capitalist impulses are increasingly bringing men, children, and the entire world into their destructive fold.

The first few minutes address globalization and Western white supremacy, specifically. As one interviewee says, the message that many members of non-Western societies receive is that you “join Western culture…by taking a Western body.” The body becomes a gendered, raced, national project — something that separates modern individuals from traditional ones — and corporations are all too ready to exploit these ideas. (x)

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Because the realist analysis of racial inequality assumes that racism is produced exclusively by the intentions and choices of individuals, intermediate institutions that play a crucial part in generating and maintaining racial inequality are rarely analyzed. The routine practices of corporations, law firms, banks, athletic teams, labor unions, the military, and educational institutions tend to be ignored or minimized. These institutions are neither scrutinized nor analyzed unless or until they institute strategies that redress past social grievances. Accordingly, advocates of this approach to racial inequality believe that individual access to previously segregated institutions is all that is necessary to redress past racial injustice. They never discuss the ways in which these institutions might be transformed to accommodate or better engage the groups they formerly excluded.

Any analysis of racial inequality that routinely neglects organizations and practices that, intentionally or unintentionally, generate or maintain racial inequalities over long periods of time is incomplete and misleading. Such an analysis will be unable, for example, to detect the ways in which real estate and mortgage lending industries routinely sustain segregated housing markets and discriminate against would-be black homeowners. It will also not notice that discrimination in the criminal justice system is produced by a large number of small decisions by the police that single out young black men, the results of which then extend to their treatment in adult courts.

Nowhere is the folly of neglecting institutional practices more apparent than in the case of racial disparities in health care and mortality. Many health care institutions remain partially segregated despite the end of Jim Crow and federal laws that prohibit distribution of federal funds to institutions that discriminate. The private nursing home industry, for example, has continued to be segregated, largely because for-profit nursing homes are reluctant to accept Medicaid patients, particularly elderly blacks, and state governments have little incentive to enforce civil rights laws. Elderly blacks are therefore less likely to use private nursing homes even though they have a greater need for such care. In Pennsylvania the segregation index for nursing homes is almost as high as the indexes for housing in metropolitan areas. Moreover, nonwhites are almost twice as likely as whites to be admitted to a nursing home sanctioned by state officials for serious deficiencies in care and facilities."

Michael K. Brown et. al., Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society

It’s long but it’s a great explanation of what people’s definition of racism misses.

(via wretchedoftheearth)

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gvcci-ghost:

Nash’s new tattoo

gvcci-ghost:

Nash’s new tattoo

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